Stuffs

thoughts, funnies, cutnesses, and more


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Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive
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Reblogged from algumacoisapop
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Reblogged from rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

Zookeepers in Australia Care for Orphaned Wombat

An orphaned Common Wombat Joey, named ‘Chloe’, is receiving round-the-clock care at Taronga Zoo after its mother was struck by a car outside Sydney.

Taronga Keeper, Evelyn Weston, has taken on the role of surrogate mother to the six-month-old female joey, carrying a makeshift pouch and stopping work for bottle feeds every five hours.

Photo: Paul Fahy/Taronga Zoo

Learn more, see more PICS: ZooBorns

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Reblogged from dynamicoceans
dynamicoceans:

Swimming crabs are characterized by the flattening of the fifth pair of legs into broad paddles, which are used for swimming. This ability, together with their strong, sharp claws, allows many species to be fast and aggressive predators.
Video

dynamicoceans:

Swimming crabs are characterized by the flattening of the fifth pair of legs into broad paddles, which are used for swimming. This ability, together with their strong, sharp claws, allows many species to be fast and aggressive predators.

Video

(via rhamphotheca)

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Reblogged from rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

October is Save the Kiwi Month!  The National Zoo, in Washington D.C., boasts the nation’s only “Meet a Kiwi” program, where visitors can observe our young male, Pip, up close and learn about conservation efforts. Meet and greets take place every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 11 a.m. The Zoo has contributed greatly to the Brown Kiwi Species Survival Plan; Maori (father) and Nessus (mother) produced six chicks from February 2006 to March 2012. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., also has a breeding pair of kiwi and hatched a chick January 2013. Native to New Zealand, brown kiwis (Apteryx mantelli) are nocturnal, flightless birds. The remaining wild population of the brown kiwi is estimated at roughly 24,000, down from 60,000 in the 1980s. The kiwi population is stabilizing in areas where conservation efforts occur. #WeSaveSpeciesPhoto Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo
(via: Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

rhamphotheca:

October is Save the Kiwi Month!

The National Zoo, in Washington D.C., boasts the nation’s only “Meet a Kiwi” program, where visitors can observe our young male, Pip, up close and learn about conservation efforts. Meet and greets take place every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 11 a.m.

The Zoo has contributed greatly to the Brown Kiwi Species Survival Plan; Maori (father) and Nessus (mother) produced six chicks from February 2006 to March 2012. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., also has a breeding pair of kiwi and hatched a chick January 2013.

Native to New Zealand, brown kiwis (Apteryx mantelli) are nocturnal, flightless birds. The remaining wild population of the brown kiwi is estimated at roughly 24,000, down from 60,000 in the 1980s. The kiwi population is stabilizing in areas where conservation efforts occur. #WeSaveSpecies

Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

(via: Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

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Reblogged from derpycats
derpycats:

This is Patra. I thought it was too adorable that she was sitting with her paws crossed so I decided to take a photo. She then made this face.

derpycats:

This is Patra. I thought it was too adorable that she was sitting with her paws crossed so I decided to take a photo. She then made this face.

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Reblogged from ilovecharts
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Reblogged from byeeeeeeeeeeeee-e-deactivated20
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Reblogged from funnywildlife
funnywildlife:

Serval Kitten by San Diego Zoo Global on Flickr.
Giraffe cat
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Reblogged from onegirlinalltheworld

onegirlinalltheworld:

I mean, if you’re looking for fun, there’s death, there’s glory, and sod all else, right?

(via weheartbtvs)